Judging by Looks Alone

After writing Wednesday’s column Neale Donald Walsch, I stopped to consider the movie which I usually do after watching a film.  Returning to the topics and scenes, I consider whether the movie continues to resonate with me.  Typically, if I come out of a movie with positive feelings, I still have to let it percolate for a while before I can REALLY say if it was worth my time.

 

Conversations with God was no different.  While I watched the movie, I found myself a bit uncomfortable with Neale Walsch’s living arrangements.  Living on the street, looking for food behind restaurants, seeing others fight with drug and alcohol abuse can take its toll on anyone.

 

Everyone goes through challenges in their lives.  We who have the resources to live comfortably have to be grateful for our lives and when we see someone less fortunate, we should attempt to help those who need a leg up.  That doesn’t always mean giving out money.

 

It could something as simple as a smile.
It could be something as simple as letting someone get warm by allowing them inside.

Or as in one scene in Conversations with God that particularly stood out:
If someone needs to use the facilities in a public restaurant, we can certainly let them.

 

In the scene I’m referring to, Neale Walsch was outside a restaurant and needed the restroom. Whether this truly happened or not is beside the issue, I’m sure something similar has happened to the homeless:
A waiter standing outside the back door refuses to let Walsch in, while making derogatory comments.  It takes someone else to come out and let Walsch in.

 

While watching the movie I often wondered what Walsch would do after he became successful.  All it takes is to be in the right place at the right moment and meet the right person at the right moment. That’s what happened to him.

 

And it’s another example of God moving the right people into your life at JUST the RIGHT moment.

A woman named Leora Garcia enters Walsch’s life at THAT right moment.  She works for a radio station and hires Walsch as a part time DJ.  Little do either of them know that first encounter will leads to future success that is beyond either of their expectations.

 

Some who walk the homeless life do work their way back.

Why do we look at ALL the homeless and generalize them as in the scene I mentioned above where Neale needed the restroom and the waiter refused him entry, and making comments such as:
Why don’t you people get a job?
We don’t want you around here.  etc.

 

All the while I’m watching this exchange, I know clearly that Walsch eventually finds success that will eclipse this waiter.  I wonder what these people who knew the Walsch who lives on the street think of him now that he has success beyond anyone’s comprehension.  That’s why I titled this column as I did.

 

It so important to look beyond an initial impression of someone.  While first impressions are important, they shouldn’t be used as the ONLY judgement call one makes as can be clearly seen from this movie.

 

We all make judgements of people.  What we have to be aware of is NOT to carry those judgements through our entire lives.  We have to shake off those unwarranted beliefs.

 

God says:
Don’t judge, lest ye be judged.

 

Can you follow those words?

 

Be Happy!  Be Well!  Be positive!
Blessings to you.

Chris

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